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are our troops dying and yet we just seem to go on and on talking about the fiscal cliff? well, i know that's important. mr. speaker, it is time for congress to realize that we are having young men and women to die in afghanistan for a failed policy that will not change one thing. mr. speaker, before closing, i make reference to this poster of a young american in a casket being carried by his colleagues to be buried. please, american people, put pressure on congress to bring our troops home now and not wait until december, 2014. i ask god to please bless our men and women in uniform, to please bless the loved ones who lost those in iraq and afghanistan. please, god, help get our troops home now and not later. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizing the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: mr. speaker, mitt romney weathered a storm of criticism late in the campaign after hurricane sandy for his earlier comments about privatizing fema and turning responsibility back to state and local governments. but during an era of fiscal restra
on fiscal cliff talks. i think obama will be speaking at some point today. and so that's definitely what traders have been focused on. but still while we are holding these bid levels, really kind of chop type trade and not a lot of energy, not a lot of yiks for the most part. >> what about the slew of special difference sends we've be dividends we've been seeing? >> i think that's been encouraging for the most part. but one thing i just heard about the dividends from microsoft and oracle, but i heard pc sales for microsoft were off like 20 some% year to year. so while they came out with the windows 8 launch into the holidays, really it's kind of backfired for the most part and there hasn't been a lot of major response to that relative to some of the other apple type releases that we've seen. and again it's just faltering if you will. but i think the positive energy if you will certainly contributed as well as the economic data this terms of contributing to the up side activity. but it's a bit of a grind to the up side. again, not these -- other than wednesday, not these really huge moves
for everything he has done. [laughter] and now we can talk about the fiscal cliff. let me start off just by -- we will do the house rules, except we will cut in half. 30 seconds -- then we will have time to elaborate on all this. i want to go through the panel. what do think the odds are that some kind of the deal will be cut by january 1 in order to avoid sequestration and all the tax hikes? mark, i will start with you. >> i think it is 80% that we will avoid sequestration. the question is, though, is this going to be a big enough deal, and will actually be enough of a down payment that it will lead to something else subsequently that will actually avoid the kind of enormous consequences of $16 trillion of debt? that percentage will be lower than the 80%. >> let's come back to the big picture -- in the short term, by january 1 -- will we avoid the cliff? >> i think it is likely that we avoid it. it does not appear that that is going so well. it is so easy for us just to do the things we need to do. i think the real line in the sand is going to be the debt ceiling. i really do think -- i have sai
are willing to advocate for what is right. i want to talk about that today. i want to -- fiscal cliff, the last time i use that term, because it's not that, but there are serious fiscal issues we should address. i want to talk about a few things we should not be discussing and don't need to talk about and one is social security. social security does not contribute to the deficit. it's not expiring. there's no reason we have to deal with social security right now. it is one of those things that some people who never liked social security, by the way, called it socialism even, want a change and has been wanting to change for decades, so they create this imagery of crisis coming at the end of the year, then what they are trying to do is say, well, we got to change social security because of the so-called fiscal cliff, although it's not really a cliff. so this is something that really shouldn't be on the table. i want to encourage folks to really discuss and get the facts, mr. speaker, because social security is solvent through 2037. doesn't need to be fixed -- does it need to be fixed? y
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4